"We Are But Humble Singers." The Song of the Hamilton Family

Dublin Core

Title

"We Are But Humble Singers." The Song of the Hamilton Family

Description

Written to be sung at the Grand Concert at the Cooper Institute, March 31st, 1862.

MUSIC AND WORDS BY ROBERT HAMILTON.

Solo No. 1.—to be sung by James M'Cune Smith.
If I were a speaker,

And ready with the tongue,

I'd raise my voice in every land

To deprecate all wrong.

Like Brongham and O'Connell,

Or he of silvery voice,

Our Phillips, or great Cheever,

Would freemen's hearts rejoice.


Chorus by the Family.—
We are but humble singers,

Bt to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's talk of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring,

This glorious strain of freedom

Is now the first we'll sing.


"Viva l'America"—In which the audience will please join.

Solo No. 2.—To be sung by Robert Ezekiel.—
If I were a soldier,

Call'd to the battle field,

To fight our country's direct foes,

My sword I'd never yield

Till every infamous Southron

Who, steep'd in infamy,

Would sell us to aristocrats,

Were driven in the sea.


Chorus.—We are but humble singers.

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring,

This second song of Freedom

We'll now begin to sing.


Chorus for the audience:—
"My country 'tis of thee," &c.

Solo No. 3.—To be sung by Fanny Jane.
If I were a teacher,

To gentle youth I'd turn,

And on their bright green memories

The words of Freedom burn.

To each her glorious standard,

In God's great name would give,

That they in coming manhood

Might bear it high, and live.


Chorus:—
We are but humble singers,

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring:

This is the third glad p[?]

We now begin to sing.


Chorus for the audience—
"The Marsellaise Hymn."

Solo No. 4—By Mary Adelphine.—
If I were a writer

With ready thought and pen,

In words of burning eloquence

To all the hearts of men,

Would call in accents gentle,

O'er woodland, lake , and sea,

Rise! strike the chain from every slave!

Let man o'er earth be free!


Chorus:—
We are but humble singers,

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring:

This is the fourth grand chorus

Which now we'll try to sing.


Chorus for the audience:—
"O Columbia! the gen of the ocean."

Solo No. 5.—By Adelline Matilda.
If I were a player,

Alive to glorious fame,

I would perform these characters

Where Freedom hath a name.

I'd cull from our own author,

Whose flowers forever bloom;

And hold to nature's mirror.

The house of "Uncle Tom."


Chorus:—
We are but humble singers,

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring:

And this is the fifth sweet melody

Trumphantly we'll sing


Chorus for the audience:—
"The star spangled banner."

Solo No. 6.—By Olivia Augsts.
If I were a preacher

In Christ's great name I'd stand,

And tell my erring countrymen

That guilt is on our land!

But since I am a mother,

My child's first thoughts I'll crown

With memories of our warrior saint;

And sing of old John Brown.


Chorus:—
We are but humble singers,

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring:

And now our sixth in harmony

We'll all begin to sing.


Chorus for the audience:—
"John Brown's body lies," &c.

Solo No. 7.—By the father.
If I were the President,

And had but legal power,

I'd end this blasting mildew

Now resting on our dower.

I'd call to every sire

To pass the vow to son,—

That never more shall slave's foot tread

The land of Washington.


Chorus:—
We are but humble singers,

But to the world we'll go,

And tell to men of every clime

Poor Afric's tale of wo.

And then we'll chant the blessings

Fair Liberty doth bring:

Closing with Doxologies

To Heav'ns eternal King.


Chorus for all:—
Praise God from whom all blessings, &c."

Creator

Robert Hamilton

Source

1:33, p. 2

Date

3.15.1862

Citation

Robert Hamilton, “"We Are But Humble Singers." The Song of the Hamilton Family,” Periodical Poets, accessed July 25, 2024, https://periodicalpoets.com/items/show/760.

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