The following verses area parody on the well known song of "Two hundred years ago," sung by the "Sons of Liberty" on the celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the landing of the Puritans at Plymouth.

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The following verses area parody on the well known song of "Two hundred years ago," sung by the "Sons of Liberty" on the celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the landing of the Puritans at Plymouth.

Description

New York, April 3, 1837.
I.
Come listen to my story,

Tho' often told before,

Of men who deem it glory

To pass thro' travail sore;

Of men who do for conscience' sake,

There name and wealth forego, -

Like those who sought their freedom here,

Two hundred years ago.

II.
Oh! 'tis no earth-born passion

That leads these men to say,

What e'er doth curse the nation,

Should straight be done away;

The voice of suffering bids them look

To scenes of want and woe.

Their course is that their fathers took

Two hundred years ago.

III.
Dark were the times and dreary,

And cheerless was the frown,

Of those who tried till weary,

To put the "madman" down;

When first they met, as did their sires,

In face of friend and foe, -

Who planted here devotions' fires,

Two hundred years ago.

IV.
They met, and thought with sorrow

On injured Africa's woes;

Tho' dismal seemed the morrow,

Their prayer of faith arose;

And nought could daunt this fearless band,

Or sink their courage low;

For those had been, who did the same,

Two hundred years ago.

V.
In humble prayer and fasting,

For those who toil in grief,

They prayed the Everlasting

To send them sure relief.

That cov'nant God has prov'd to them,*

A shield from every foe, -

Who gave their sires a dwelling here,

Two hundred years ago.

VI.
Of fair Columbia's glory,

They keep the corner stone;

This praise in deathless story,

Posterity shall own.

Prophetic they foresaw in time,

Their cause should mighty grow, -

Tho' feeble then, as was their sires,

Two hundred years ago.

VII.
If greatness be enduring,

These men are truly great,

On whom, abuse unsparing,

The mob, and gibbet wait.

And oft' their treacherous foes combine,

And strive to overthrow

Those precepts, which their fathers taught

Two hundred years ago.

VIII.
Tho' seeming overzealous,

In things by some deem'd light,

They are but duly jealous

Of powers usurping right.

They nobly choose to part with all,

To risk their lives, although

Their zeal is but their fathers had

Two hundred years ago.

IX.
From seeds they've sown in weeping,

Shall richest harvests rise:

They still the fruits are reaping

Of freedom's enterprize.

Enfranchis'd slaves shall soon repay

The debt of fame they owe,

A greater, than on us impos'd

Two hundred years ago.

X.
When comes the period yearly,

To celebrate the day,

(I' will not be purchased dearly)

Of slavery done away;

Freemen shall raise the native song,

And from their lips shall flow,

Such tribute, as our fathers earn'd

Two hundred years ago.

*The Abolitionists

Creator

Unattributed

Source

1:17, p. 4

Date

1837.04.29

Citation

Unattributed, “The following verses area parody on the well known song of "Two hundred years ago," sung by the "Sons of Liberty" on the celebration of the Two Hundredth Anniversary of the landing of the Puritans at Plymouth.,” Periodical Poets, accessed February 24, 2024, https://periodicalpoets.com/items/show/203.

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